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From Crocodile Mimic to Giant Eagle by Sekley From Crocodile Mimic to Giant Eagle by Sekley
I'm starting some comparison infographics between real dinosaurs and their pop culture counterparts. I always laugh at myself for drawing the parody versions.

Credit to :iconscotthartman: for skeletal references.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
Pretty cool!

I'd recommend changing "giant skeletal horror" to "giant, slender horror"; if you think that's too nice, change it to "giant anorexic horror".

Otherwise, pretty spot on!
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:iconpaleop:
Paleop Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
“it is now known that T. rex was covered in thick shaggy feathers similar to an emu”

Not necessarily. It's entirely possible rex had a relatively thin coating of feathers. 

Wording is important ;) 
just a tip.
“it is quite likely that T. rex was covered in thick shaggy feathers similar to an emu”
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017
Alright, but I would think it'd make more sense given how cold Laramidia could get in the winter.
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:iconpaleop:
Paleop Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't disagree with it having a solid coat of feathers, but don't forget to take into account that T. rex is over double the size of Yutyrannus.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017
True, but neither produces as much metabolic body heat as the modern herbivores they weigh as much as. Ugh we need Hell Creek tyrannosaur feathers soon.
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:iconpaleop:
Paleop Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, T. rex produces the same amount of body heat as a 3 ton mammal. we don't have any of those that are non-aquatic/ amphibious do we?

"Ugh we need Hell Creek tyrannosaur feathers soon."
We need answers to questions.
regardless of what those are.
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:iconjoe4d:
Joe4D Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Digital Artist

I just want to point out that “it is now known that T. rex was covered in thick shaggy feathers similar to an emu” might not be correct. For now we simply don’t know it exactly. Yutyrannus for example had feathers on areas where we have scaly skin impressions form T. rex, so T. rex could have lost the feathers completely.
The skin imprints which you are talking about are also interpreted as scales by some Paleontologists. So again we don’t know if T. rex was scaly or had feathers.
And my personal opinion after doing some research is that T. rex had no feathers.

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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2017
Well like Yutyrannus, T. rex lived in an area that could drop to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep in mind we only have tyrannosaur skin impressions from the bottom of the tail, feet, chest, and neck. The latter was naked skin on Tarbosaurus. That's like saying a bird is scaly or naked based on only skin impressions from the feet and plucked chest.
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:iconjoe4d:
Joe4D Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Digital Artist

But due to the fossils which were found T. Rex must had at least less feathers (and this is fact and no speculation). If less feathers are possible, so it would also be possible that T. Rex has lost the feathers on the whole body.
Yutyrannus had also three fingers and T. Rex two for example. It needs more to lose a finger in evolution than just change the body coverage.
Therefore it is absolutely possible that T. Rex had no feathers at all.

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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2017
Oh definitely. We know the feet and bottom of the tail at the very least were scaly, but still it makes sense for the animal's torso at the least to be quite fluffy due to the cold environment.  
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:iconjoe4d:
Joe4D Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Digital Artist

I do not want to deny that feathers make sense. But again if less feathers are possible, so it would also be possible that T. Rex has lost the feathers on the whole body. There is no reason why this would be impossible. We also know Dinosaurs without feathers which have lived in the same climate.
Don’t forget that T. Rex and Yutyrannus are separated by almost 60 million years and have lived on different continents. For example from Mammoth to Elephant there was much less time needed to lose the fur. And a Mammoth is much more similar to an Elephant than Yutyrannus to T. Rex.
Therefore is
absolutely not safe to say that T. Rex definitely had feathers.

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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2017
But it's looking very unlikely tyrannosaurs became naked and bald. Tyrannosaurus' scaly peers were all herbivores and thus they produced more body heat due to all the fermentation of plant matter. Also your mammoth argument has a big hole. The mammoth's hair is a derived trait not a basal one. Plus mammoths didn't evolve into modern elephants. They are more like cousins to elephants. Saying a tyrannosaur is completely bald based on a handful of skin samples is like saying a chicken is bald if you only found skin impressions of the feet and nothing else.
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:iconjoe4d:
Joe4D Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Digital Artist

With "mammoths didn't evolve into modern elephants..." you are right, but maybe Yutyrannus belongs not actually to tyrannosauroids. This is described in the following article: reptilis.net/2012/07/23/feathe…
(under the heading Yutyrannus the tyrannosaur?)

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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2017
Seriously you're using that site as reference? Come back with a scientific journal and we'll talk.
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:iconzimzilla99:
Zimzilla99 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2017
How would they be a Godzilla wannabe when Gojira was realized in 1954 when your stating they were Gojira wannabes in the 1930s, 24 years before Gojira
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2017
Good point. I ought to fix that, but the point still stands theropods from the 1930's onwards looked like a Gorosaurus ripoff.
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:iconzimzilla99:
Zimzilla99 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2017
Just say the monsters from Unknown Island which came out in 1948 if your dead set on a movie reference.

Not to mention Gorosaurus is from 1968 way after the 1930 and a lot of inaccurate dinosaur monsters had come out before him

- Anguirus from Godzilla raids again 1955
- the beast from 20 thousand fathoms 1953
- The Giant Behemoth 1959
- Gorgo 1961
- and monsters from the original Ultraman 1966
- the dinosaurs in turok - 1954
And Baragon from Frankenstein Conquers the World 1965

and a whole lot of others
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
I don't think I follow the middle part.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
From giant rampaging lizard to ordinary bird-like predator.
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
No, the middle text.  What do you mean it wasn't the king?
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
It's just an animal and honestly it's a 50/50 between it and the other giant theropods.
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
Its intelligence is unrivaled.  Its bite is unrivaled.  Not even its senses could be matched.  That qualifies as kingly to me.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
"Its intelligence is unrivaled"

Wow, absolute statement about something that is virtually an unknown value, just beautiful, 10/10 akurat. Honestly, did you just take that statement from Youtube, Topix, or some other unreliable place? The true intelligence levels of the nonavian dinosaurs are pretty much unknown, and out best guess based on bracketing spans the range between crocodilians and ravens. If EQ levels are brought up, it's not really a good measure of intelligence, because if it were, whales would be dumb as bricks, while they aren't.


"Its bite is unrivaled."

If we're talking about overall bite damage potential, it is rivalled by other similarly-sizes raptorial macropredatory theropods. Tyrannosaurus' bite was a specialization, not an all-powerful superweapon. If we're talking about raw bite force, most other theropod clades aren't as specialized towards crushing and thus do not have the evolutionary incentive to evolve higher bite forces. Meanwhile, other similarly-sized tyrannosaurines such as Alamotyrannus could easily have rival bite forces, due to their similar jaw construction as tyrannosaurines and similar size.


"Not even its senses could be matched."

WTF!? How? What do you think Tyrannosaurus is?


"That qualifies as kingly to me."

Because you apparently swallowed a bunch of hyperbolic statements about it from what I can only assume are from places like Youtube, carnivoraforum, etc., right? You should be better than this.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
Just because it has a bird-like brain doesn't mean it's smarter. It just means it probably acted and had neurology more like a bird. I personally think all these giant carnivores had similar intelligence and senses. Except for T. rex's vision. That's unique. I'll agree with ace it's not a king despite being an impressive animal, but I don't bash on the things it's definitely capable of. It's vision is probably the best among all terrestrial vertebrates and it can exert a bite force of 6 tons of pressure. That said the other giant theropods are also unique and powerful. Giganotosaurus can sheer through flesh with its insanely sharp teeth and is just as bulky pound for pound as T. rex. Spinosaurus is the only large carnivore to make a living for itself in water and swim potentially up to 30 mph. 
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
What about its bite?  Surely no other theropod could top that mouth.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2017
Sure it's an armor punching flesh ripper, but it has a limited gape. It's optimum gape to bite full force is 28 degrees. Any wider and it loses strength and can't open any wider than 65 degrees.
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